MALADAPTIVE PARENTING AND PEER GROUP BULLYING AS PATHOLOGICAL PATHWAYS TO BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER SYMPTOMS IN EARLY ADULT: CASE REPORT

Authors

  • Hayuning Widhihutami Siloam Hospitals Sentosa, Bekasi, Indonesia
  • Zuhrotun Ulya Department of Psychiatry Faculty of Medicine Brawijaya University, Malang, Indonesia https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3701-8250

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.21776/ub.jppbr.2023.004.02.5

Keywords:

borderline personality disorder, maladaptive parenting, bullying

Abstract

Introduction – Maladaptive experiences during adolescene have been consistently linked with borderline personality disorder. BPD is a serious mental illness characterized by pervasive pattern of instability in affect regulation, impulse control, interpersonal relationships, and self-image. Tthere was an interrelated relationship between parenting experiences and the development of BPD symptoms. Children who reported chronic bullying had a fivefold increase in the likelihood of developing BPD symptoms.

MethodsPresented the case of patient, 20 years old young male with symptoms of borderline personality disorder turned out to have maladaptive parenting and history of became victim by peer group bullying since childhood. Data were taken from interviews and mental status examinations in psychiatric clinics, then a literature review was carried out.

Results – The development of borderline personality disorder in adult linked with report of low care parenting, involves coldness, indifference, and rejection.  BPD is also inevitable from hereditary risk factors.

Discuss – There is a direct significant association between being victim of bullying and development of BPD. Empathy is one important aspect of social behavior that may not function in BPD. Atypical depressed patients with affective dysregulation first diagnosed with borderline personality disorder if do not meet the diagnostic criteria for bipolar disorder.

Conclusion – Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is very prone to occur in young adults. Starting from affect dysregulation, inability to impulse control, unstable interpersonal relationships, and unstable self-image that begin to develop in children and adolescents when exposed to environmental risk factors. Risk factors that are very often influencing are family and peer group relationships. BPD is also an entry point for developing into bipolar disorder. Therefore, effective interventions should be targeted, early preventing the development of affect dysregulation in the development of the borderline personality disorder by reducing exposure to environmental risk factors.    

Keywords: borderline personality disorder, maladaptive parenting, bullying.

References

Winsper, C., Zanarini, M., & Wolke, D. (2012). Prospective study of family adversity and maladaptive parenting in childhood and borderline personality disorder symptoms in a non-clinical population at 11 years. Psychological medicine. doi:10.1017/S0033291712000542.

Kaess, M., Brunner, R., & Chanen, A. (2014). Borderline personality disorder in adolescence. Pediatrics. 134(4), 782-793. doi:10.1542/peds.2013-3677.

Winsper, C., Hall, J., Strauss, V. Y., & Wolke, D. (2017). Aetiological pathways to Borderline Personality Disorder symptoms in early adolescence: childhood dysregulated behaviour, maladaptive parenting and bully victimisation. Borderline personality disorder and emotion dysregulation. 4(1), 1-10.. doi:10.1186/s40479-017-0060-x.

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 5th ed. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Publishing.

Belsky, D. W., Caspi, A., Arseneault, L., Bleidorn, W., Fonagy, P., Goodman, M., & Moffitt, T. E. (2012). Etiological features of borderline personality related characteristics in a birth cohort of 12-year-old children. Development and psychopathology. 24(1), 251. doi: 10.1017/S0954579411000812.

Jovev, M., McKenzie, T., Whittle, S., Simmons, J. G., Allen, N. B., & Chanen, A. M. (2013). Temperament and maltreatment in the emergence of borderline and antisocial personality pathology during early adolescence. Journal of the Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 22(3), 220.

Stepp, S. D., Whalen, D. J., Scott, L. N., Zalewski, M., Loeber, R., & Hipwell, A. E. (2014). Reciprocal-effects of parenting and borderline personality disorder symptoms in adolescent girls. Development and psychopathology. 26(2), 361. doi: 10.1017/S0954579413001041.

Rogosch, F. A., & Cicchetti, D. (2005). Child maltreatment, attention networks, and potential precursors to borderline personality disorder. Development and psychopathology. 17(4), 1071.

Wolke, D., Schreier, A., Zanarini, M. C., & Winsper, C. (2012). Bullied by peers in childhood and borderline personality symptoms at 11 years of age: a prospective study. Journal of child psychology and psychiatry. 53(8), 846-855. doi:10.1111/j.1469-7610.2012.02542.x.

Patrick, M., Hobson, R. P., Castle, D., Howard, R., & Maughan, B. (1994). Personality disorder and the mental representation of early social experience. Development and Psychopathology, 6, 375-375.

Sapouna, M., Wolke, D., Vannini, N., Watson, S., Woods, S., Schneider, W., & Aylett, R. (2012). Individual and social network predictors of the short‐term stability of bullying victimization in the United Kingdom and Germany. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 82(2), 225-240. doi: 10.1111/j.2044-8279.2011.02022.x.

Crowell, S. E., Beauchaine, T. P., & Linehan, M. M. (2009). A biosocial developmental model of borderline personality: Elaborating and extending linehan’s theory. Psychological bulletin, 135(3), 495. doi: 10.1037/a0015616.

Harari, H., Shamay-Tsoory, S. G., Ravid, M., & Levkovitz, Y. (2010). Double dissociation between cognitive and affective empathy in borderline personality disorder. Psychiatry research, 175(3), 277-279. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2009.03.002.

Perugi, G., Fornaro, M., & Akiskal, H. S. (2011). Are atypical depression, borderline personality disorder and bipolar II disorder overlapping manifestations of a common cyclothymic diathesis. World Psychiatry, 10(1), 45. doi: 10.1002/j.2051-5545.2011.tb00013.x.

Downloads

Published

2023-09-30

How to Cite

Widhihutami, H., & Ulya, Z. (2023). MALADAPTIVE PARENTING AND PEER GROUP BULLYING AS PATHOLOGICAL PATHWAYS TO BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER SYMPTOMS IN EARLY ADULT: CASE REPORT. Journal of Psychiatry Psychology and Behavioral Research, 4(2), 18–21. https://doi.org/10.21776/ub.jppbr.2023.004.02.5